Jasmine runs into a supermarket, sneaks an olive, and suddenly finds herself in an alternate universe where she is magically pregnant. Trapped in a market with bizarre baby products and shoppers with philosophies on how to survive, Jasmine has to find her own way out. 
 

 

FILMS

CUBA MIA  
47 minutes  - PBS 

VIDEO ART

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VIDEO & COLLABORATIONS  
 

THE SCREENING ROOM

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NEW-MEDIA EXHIBITION  
& PROJECT SPACE

VIDEO

 
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Raised by Cuban and Argentinean parents, Rhonda Mitrani left Miami for University of Michigan and then landed a job in post production for Miramax Films, New York.  She started editing for independent film and television, including SHOWTIME and ABC, and festivals (Sundance and LAIFF),  until she until she made her first documentary, CUBA MIA, which premiered with Miami International Film Festival and broadcast on PBS. 

Mitrani is also a video artist, whose exhibits include Dot Fifty One Gallery,  Wynwood Art Fair, The Girl’s Club Collection, TRIAD, London and recently her first solo show at the Boca Museum of Art with her collaborative RPM Project. 

In 2013 Mitrani opened The Screening Room, a new-media exhibition and project space located in Miami. The multi-disciplinary space is dedicated to motion picture which includes video art exhibitions, film workshops and lectures, screenings and a space for filmmakers and video artists to work.

Mitrani wrote, coproduced and directed her first fiction film, SuperMarket, a short inspired by her experiences with pregnancy. The film is executive produced by Killer Impact, a division of Killer Content. She is currently writing a feature. 

SELECTED SCREENING AND EXHIBITIONS : 
Boca Museum of Art- PBS - Miami International Film Festival - Art Wynwood - MADA New Media Festival - SF Art Center - Girl's Club Collection - New York International Latino Film Festival

 
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